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From the vice president and chief technologist for SOA at Oracle Corporation

Dave Chappell

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Top Stories by Dave Chappell

Since releasing my latest book, Enterprise Service Bus (O'Reilly Media, 2004), I have been doing a fair amount of visiting corporations, conducting seminars, and generally discussing with enterprise architects the subject of enterprise service-oriented architecture (SOA) and how an enterprise service bus (ESB) backbone can be leveraged to provide a framework for an enterprise SOA. Along the way, I have been asked many questions about the nature of an ESB. I have also fended off some misconceptions that have been growing in the general IT population regarding what an ESB is and when, where, and how it can be used. I have gathered together the most popular questions and misconceptions, and offer some clarity in the form of a "top ten" list. Myth #1. ESB is just a new name for EAI. While many IT architecture groups are focusing on building SOAs, they still inevitably be... (more)

Improving the Efficiency of SOA-Based Applications

According to Moore's Law [1], processing speed and storage capacity have been doubling about every two years since the invention of the integrated circuit in 1958. Yet it seems that our propensity for building larger more complex software systems that anticipate these improvements inevitably outpace the exponential growth in capacity to support these systems. SOA is becoming more broadly adopted, along with the practice of using XML as a means of communicating data between services and the more rapid adoption of applications to Internet scale. Staring you in the face of your app... (more)

Distributed Logging Using The JMS

Every software system has logging requirements so application processing can be monitored and tracked. Modern distributed systems, which are usually based on application frameworks, require a logging solution that can cope with multiple processes on multiple hosts sending logging information to a single logging service. Many application frameworks widely used today, whether they're high-level frameworks like J2EE application servers or low-level frameworks like CORBA ORBs, don't provide a distributed logging facility for application code. Using JMS queues to log application mess... (more)

Asynchronous Web Services

In a recent "Strategic Planning" research note, Gartner issued a prediction that "by 2004, more than 25 percent of all standard Web services traffic will be asynchronous...." and "by 2006, more than 40 percent of the standard Web services traffic will be asynchronous." One of the cornerstones of Web services interoperability is the SOAP (Simple Object Access Protocol). SOAP began simply as a way of performing a synchronous RPC (Remote Procedure Call) across the Internet over an HTTP connection. However, the current "owners" of SOAP ­ the XML Protocol WG at the W3C ­ have been t... (more)

Reconstructing J2EE-Java Business Integration Meets the Enterprise Service Bus

Web services have given newfound importance to service-oriented architectures and promise to drive down the cost of integration by providing a standards-based approach to interoperability between applications. The trouble is, what people really want is a new way of doing integration. Until now, we haven't really had a way to incorporate Web services into a meaningful architecture for integrating applications and services into a fabric that spans the extended enterprise in a large-scale fashion. With the advent of the enterprise service bus we have that architecture. The Java Bus... (more)