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From the vice president and chief technologist for SOA at Oracle Corporation

Dave Chappell

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Top Stories by Dave Chappell

The notion of guaranteed delivery of Java Message Service messages has been lightly touched on in other recently published articles on JMS. But what really makes a JMS message "guaranteed"? Should you just take it on faith, or would you like to know what's behind it? This article answers these questions via a detailed discussion of message persistence, internal acknowledgment rules, and message redelivery. Using excerpts condensed from the book we coauthored, Java Message Service, we'll explain how JMS guaranteed messaging works - including once-and-only-once delivery semantics, durable subscriptions, failure and recovery scenarios, and transacted messages. JMS Guaranteed Messaging There are three key parts to guaranteed messaging: message autonomy, store-and-forward, and the underlying message acknowledgment semantics. Before we discuss these parts, we need to revi... (more)

Distributed Logging Using The JMS

Every software system has logging requirements so application processing can be monitored and tracked. Modern distributed systems, which are usually based on application frameworks, require a logging solution that can cope with multiple processes on multiple hosts sending logging information to a single logging service. Many application frameworks widely used today, whether they're high-level frameworks like J2EE application servers or low-level frameworks like CORBA ORBs, don't provide a distributed logging facility for application code. Using JMS queues to log application mess... (more)

Service-Oriented Integration: Making the Right Choices to Support Next-Generation Integration

  Applications are increasingly being developed "built-to-integrate," providing the ability to easily expose key functionality through commonly defined interfaces. Gartner calls this concept SODA, or Service-Oriented Development of Applications, fitting into its overall Service-Oriented Architecture landscape. When applied to the ever-present integration challenge, SODA represents a transition to service-oriented integration. In this presentation, Chappell will examine the leading choices for supporting service-oriented integration: enterprise service buses (ESBs), integration ... (more)

The New Integration Architect: You

According to Gartner, Inc., vice president and research fellow Roy Schulte, "a new form of enterprise service bus (ESB) infrastructure will be running in most major enterprises by 2005." ESBs combine Web services, enterprise messaging, transformation, and routing to provide an integration network that can span global enterprises and encompass potentially thousands of application end points. Application integration is a top priority among CIOs, and as the current IT value center in the enterprise, IT organizations must shift their focus from application development to application ... (more)

Improving the Efficiency of SOA-Based Applications

According to Moore's Law [1], processing speed and storage capacity have been doubling about every two years since the invention of the integrated circuit in 1958. Yet it seems that our propensity for building larger more complex software systems that anticipate these improvements inevitably outpace the exponential growth in capacity to support these systems. SOA is becoming more broadly adopted, along with the practice of using XML as a means of communicating data between services and the more rapid adoption of applications to Internet scale. Staring you in the face of your app... (more)