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From the vice president and chief technologist for SOA at Oracle Corporation

Dave Chappell

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Top Stories by Dave Chappell

Since releasing my latest book, Enterprise Service Bus (O'Reilly Media, 2004), I have been doing a fair amount of visiting corporations, conducting seminars, and generally discussing with enterprise architects the subject of enterprise service-oriented architecture (SOA) and how an enterprise service bus (ESB) backbone can be leveraged to provide a framework for an enterprise SOA. Along the way, I have been asked many questions about the nature of an ESB. I have also fended off some misconceptions that have been growing in the general IT population regarding what an ESB is and when, where, and how it can be used. I have gathered together the most popular questions and misconceptions, and offer some clarity in the form of a "top ten" list. Myth #1. ESB is just a new name for EAI. While many IT architecture groups are focusing on building SOAs, they still inevitably be... (more)

Distributed Logging Using The JMS

Every software system has logging requirements so application processing can be monitored and tracked. Modern distributed systems, which are usually based on application frameworks, require a logging solution that can cope with multiple processes on multiple hosts sending logging information to a single logging service. Many application frameworks widely used today, whether they're high-level frameworks like J2EE application servers or low-level frameworks like CORBA ORBs, don't provide a distributed logging facility for application code. Using JMS queues to log application mess... (more)

The New Integration Architect: You

According to Gartner, Inc., vice president and research fellow Roy Schulte, "a new form of enterprise service bus (ESB) infrastructure will be running in most major enterprises by 2005." ESBs combine Web services, enterprise messaging, transformation, and routing to provide an integration network that can span global enterprises and encompass potentially thousands of application end points. Application integration is a top priority among CIOs, and as the current IT value center in the enterprise, IT organizations must shift their focus from application development to application ... (more)

ESB Integration Patterns

The past several years have seen some significant technology trends, such as service-oriented architecture (SOA), enterprise application integration (EAI), business-to-business (B2B), and Web services. These technologies have attempted to address the challenges of improving the results and increasing the value of integrated business processes, and have garnered the widespread attention of IT leaders, vendors, and industry analysts. The enterprise service bus (ESB) draws the best traits from these and other technology trends to form a new architecture for integration. The ESB conc... (more)

The Enterprise Service Bus (ESB) Delivering SOAs

Now that the WS-* specifications have become more mature, and SOA is becoming the new architectural pattern for enterprise infrastructures, there are new and unique architectural challenges that need to be addressed in order to fully enjoy the capabilities SOA provides. In order to fully exploit the interoperability that advanced Web Services provide, a SOA infrastructure must support operational flexibility, a heterogeneous application environment, scalability to support global deployment, and the ability to be managed and monitored from a central point. The enterprise service b... (more)