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From the vice president and chief technologist for SOA at Oracle Corporation

Dave Chappell

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Top Stories by Dave Chappell

The notion of guaranteed delivery of Java Message Service messages has been lightly touched on in other recently published articles on JMS. But what really makes a JMS message "guaranteed"? Should you just take it on faith, or would you like to know what's behind it? This article answers these questions via a detailed discussion of message persistence, internal acknowledgment rules, and message redelivery. Using excerpts condensed from the book we coauthored, Java Message Service, we'll explain how JMS guaranteed messaging works - including once-and-only-once delivery semantics, durable subscriptions, failure and recovery scenarios, and transacted messages. JMS Guaranteed Messaging There are three key parts to guaranteed messaging: message autonomy, store-and-forward, and the underlying message acknowledgment semantics. Before we discuss these parts, we need to revi... (more)

ESB Myth Busters: 10 Enterprise Service Bus Myths Debunked

Since releasing my latest book, Enterprise Service Bus (O'Reilly Media, 2004), I have been doing a fair amount of visiting corporations, conducting seminars, and generally discussing with enterprise architects the subject of enterprise service-oriented architecture (SOA) and how an enterprise service bus (ESB) backbone can be leveraged to provide a framework for an enterprise SOA. Along the way, I have been asked many questions about the nature of an ESB. I have also fended off some misconceptions that have been growing in the general IT population regarding what an ESB is and wh... (more)

Reconstructing J2EE-Java Business Integration Meets the Enterprise Service Bus

Web services have given newfound importance to service-oriented architectures and promise to drive down the cost of integration by providing a standards-based approach to interoperability between applications. The trouble is, what people really want is a new way of doing integration. Until now, we haven't really had a way to incorporate Web services into a meaningful architecture for integrating applications and services into a fabric that spans the extended enterprise in a large-scale fashion. With the advent of the enterprise service bus we have that architecture. The Java Bus... (more)

Beyond The JMS Specification

The Java Message Service (JMS) is a specification put forth by Sun to define a common set of APIs and common semantics for messaging-oriented middleware providers. An increasing number of MOM vendors have embraced this specification, and new vendors are building messaging products suitable for doing business-to-business communication across the Internet. The result is a landscape where developers can feel comfortable about writing an application using a standard set of APIs while still having an ample selection of JMS-compliant vendors to choose from. However, the JMS specificat... (more)

Distributed Logging Using The JMS

Every software system has logging requirements so application processing can be monitored and tracked. Modern distributed systems, which are usually based on application frameworks, require a logging solution that can cope with multiple processes on multiple hosts sending logging information to a single logging service. Many application frameworks widely used today, whether they're high-level frameworks like J2EE application servers or low-level frameworks like CORBA ORBs, don't provide a distributed logging facility for application code. Using JMS queues to log application mess... (more)